Environmental Protection Agency

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Telework for Government employees on code-red/code-orange air quality days

Government employees should be encouraged to work from home on code red air quality days. This will decrease the amount of pollution emitted, it would decrease overhead costs for the government, and it would protect human health by keeping employees from breathing the poor air quality. This could, in turn, reduce the number of doctor/hospital visits for people who are sensitive to the pollution, which would then save ...more »

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112 votes
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Legislative Branch

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Save $20M+ annually - Electronically Print & Deliver Congressional Record

The Congressional Record cost tax payers $28,390,000 each year to print and deliver to Congress. If converted to electronic format, voice and color enhancements could be added simultaneously with electronic dissemination to significantly reduce these costs in the millions of dollars. Additionally, speedier dissemination (via email, RSS Feed, special website, etc.), authentication and preservation would be guaranteed ...more »

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28 votes
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Department of the Interior

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Use RFID Chips in Passes to Reduce Greenhouse Gases

We should incorporate Radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips into the annual and lifetime passes for the National Park Service and other federal fee lands in order to drastically reduce carbon emissions from vehicles waiting to enter our national parks and other federal fee areas. Actually, this idea would provide many benefits including enhanced visitor experience due to quicker entrance, more accurate collection ...more »

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15 votes
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Department of Health and Human Services

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Piggybacking or pooling of software purchases for maximized cost savings @ local level

There should be a mechanism for federal agencies to piggyback or pool resources to purchase software and maximize efficiency of scale. For example, if I want to purchase 1 license of a product, the cost is much higher than if I purchased 500 licenses. If I'm aware of other users of this software across the federal services, ideally I should be able to contact that group to piggyback on their purchase and avoid paying ...more »

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8 votes
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US Agency for International Development

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Please save our eyes! Replace our tiny computer screens

Pay respect and attention to the critical eye health of employees. Most of us in my federal agency are working 8-10 hr days on tiny computer screens. The extra investment into large screens per user will be paid back in a short time cycle based on increased productivity, efficiency, less time downdue to eye strain and headaches, improved morale, etc.

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20 votes
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Legislative Branch

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Active use and promotion of Flex time, telecommuting and other time.work options

Press the federal agencies to actually allow employee use of the flex time options that are 'on the books' but too often individual management determine they do not want to employ in their divisions My boss is great and does her best to meet the requests of employees, but I have countless collegues who are not 'allowed' to access time/work options. If an employee has proven to be professional, productive, performance ...more »

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46 votes
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Department of the Treasury

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Combine Requests for Information to our Customers: i.e. Return Census and Tax Forms Together

The same information is often requested from multiple agencies (name, address, dependents, and income). Where possible combine forms across agencies to consolidate the requests we make of our customers. Immediate benefits will include: • Consolidate requests to our customers (in 2010 we submitted our tax and census requests within weeks of each other) • Reduce duplicate envelope cost, a more “green” approach • ...more »

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28 votes
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General Services Administration

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Train Locally – Use Existing FEB Training in 28 Locations Across U.S.

Large cost savings could be gained if federal leaders were encouraged to train their employees in the cities they work. Approximately 88% of the Federal Workforce is located outside of Washington D.C. This is better for the environment and will save the federal government in travel and per diem costs. Federal training already exists in 28 large cities through the Federal Executive Boards (www.Feb.Gov). FEB sponsored ...more »

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72 votes
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Legislative Branch

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Eliminate Duplicate Mgmt Structures

Eliminate duplicate management structures. Some agencies have redundant mgmt structures imposed upon them by MEO type agreements, resulting in additional expense and overhead, as well as confusing authority chains. If a particular manager or dept has a legitimate need for a mgmt consultant to assist with mgmt, or suggest process or efficiency improvements, that's one thing. But to duplicate an entire tree of mgmt for ...more »

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8 votes
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Legislative Branch

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Turn Federal Building Rooftops into Solar Collectors

My suggestion is for every federal building to allocate 20%-30% of its rooftop space for solar energy. Solar cells would be tied into the grids of DC electric companies. As electricity is generated, meters would automatically move backwards saving the federal government money, enough to offset the cost of this equipment within 5-years or less (especially on weekends, when little or no staff is present).

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66 votes
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Legislative Branch

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Give the National Laboratories the Respect they Deserve

I suggest that our National Laboratories have a set budget so that their researchers do not have to spend most of the time marketing their expertise to the government government agencies. Treating the national laboratories as contractors lowers efficiency and effectiveness and compromises effective research and objectivity.

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3 votes
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Department of Health and Human Services

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font change cuts costs by 30%

We should consider implementing the use of Century Gothic as the default font across government. Century Gothic uses about 30% less ink than Arial or Times New Roman. http://blog.printer.com/2009/04/printing-costs-does-font-choice-make-a-difference/ While the savings per user might be small, this, combined with simply printing fewer documents, could add up across the federal government. Additionally the reduced ink ...more »

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5 votes
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