Department of Defense

Making flat roofs green and effecient

I suggest that we install green roof systems on any of our older (bomb shelter rating) buildings that have flat roofs normally covered in tar and gravel. They already have drain systems installed on each. By putting a rows of plants on these roofs, it would reflect the majority of the sun's very hot rays, thus lowering the amount of cooling effect the air conditioning system needs to run. Which in turn would lower the... more »

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Department of Defense

We may not be killing as many trees but we continue to kill electrons...

I would suggest that we all consider taking a moment, at the end of the workday or before leaving our offices for lunch or TDY, to turn off the PC monitor(s) and desktop/office lighting. A recent computation in my office showed that turning off the dual LCD monitors and desktop flourescent lighting would save 1.16 Megawatts/person/year. This is especially important over long weekends and vacations, where noone would... more »

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Social Security Administration

Install ceiling fans to reduce heating and cooling costs.

I think ceiling fans should be installed in government offices to reduce heating and cooling costs. Fans cost next to nothing to run and can reduce energy costs by 20%. Fans do not actually cool the room, but it makes it feel cooler because of the "wind chill affect." In the winter, fans can be used to blow the warmer air at the ceiling back down to make you feel warmer. A fan can be purchased and installed for $100.... more »

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Executive Office of the President

Require casual dress in the summer.

In Congress and in many offices in the executive branch, suits and ties are the norm for employees. In large part, this is to preserve the decorum of the office. However, in some other countries, the government forgoes formality and requires business casual in the summer to reduce air conditioning costs. Taking the lead in dressing green -- the summertime equivalent of putting on a sweater -- would both save federal energy... more »

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4 votes
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Department of Commerce

Don't overdo the air conditioning

Don't air-condition buildings down to 69-70 degrees in the middle of summer. Please require that buildings be air-conditioned to no lower temperature than 72 degrees between Memorial Day and Labor Day. We'll save energy and money, and I won't have to wear a sweater in the office in the middle of July. Win-win!

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4 votes
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National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Increase A/C thermostat upper range limit

Air Conditioning thermostats are externally limited so that a user cannot change the temperature outside of a small range. Workers are working with their coats on because they are cold inside when it is 90-degrees outside. Increase the upper range limit so that users can make the room warmer if they want to, saving valuable electricity.

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3 votes
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Department of State

Programmable Internet/Network-Controlled Thermostats

An Internet/Network-controlled thermostat, for example, can both save the money and help the environment, by allowing to control the building's heating and air conditioning systems while you're away. -------------------------------------------------------------------- What Is a porgrammable Internet/Network Thermostat? -------------------------------------------------------------------- A thermostat is simply a small... more »

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3 votes
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Department of State

Maintaining a comfortable temperature

I suggest the federal government look at ways to stop using so much heat and air conditioning. Buildings are freezing in the summer, to the point that many offices use space heaters to stay warm. In the winter, offices are hot to the point that employees use fans. Keeping the temperatures at more reasonable levels would not only lower costs, but would make the workplace more comfortable.

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87 votes
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Department of Energy

An Idea to Save Heating and Cooling Costs and Reduce Greenhouse-Gas Emissions

The problem: Many people who work in government operated buildings often feel that the rooms in these buildings are too hot in winter and too cold in summer. The thermostats in many of these buildings either do not work or cannot be adjusted. It is very strange, inconvenient, and wasteful to have to wear short sleeves in the office and then have to bundle up going home or outside during the cold winter, and to have to... more »

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18 votes
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Legislative Branch

Turn Down the Air Conditioning!

I work in a beautiful LEED-certified building on the CDC campus in Atlanta, but the A/C is turned on so high in the summer that we have to wear sweaters and gloves. We could save a LOT of money on electricity, and improve the comfort of our workplaces, by turning the A/C up to at least 78 degrees. I believe there was a Presidential Order in 2009 to set the temperature at 78 degrees in the summer, but it does not seem... more »

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15 votes
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Department of the Interior

Out of the frying pan and into the ice box.

A number of times over this summer, it has been 90 or more degrees outside. The office building I work in would have the air conditioning running such that the interior temperature was enough that I was cold. Rather than cooling buildings to 70 degrees in the summer and heating them to 70 degrees in the winter, air conditioning should be tailored to the current conditions. For example, if outside it is very cold, the... more »

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5 votes
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National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Shut off cooling compressors, vent in outside air when temp outside below temp on thermostat

I suggest that all air conditioning on govt buildings be retrofitted with fresh-air vents and outside thermometers. Any time the temperature outside drops below the temperature on the thermostat, the AC compressors shut off and outside air is circulated to cool the building instead.

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10 votes
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