Department of Energy

Sleep/Hibernate/Standby/Turn-off Computers

I suggest that federal employees either shut down, sleep, hibernate, or standby their computers when they leave the office. Not only would this save the government a lot of money on their electric bill, but it would also save the government money on cooling (i.e. air conditioning) since idle computers can radiate a lot of heat.

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5 votes
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Social Security Administration

Install ceiling fans to reduce heating and cooling costs.

I think ceiling fans should be installed in government offices to reduce heating and cooling costs. Fans cost next to nothing to run and can reduce energy costs by 20%. Fans do not actually cool the room, but it makes it feel cooler because of the "wind chill affect." In the winter, fans can be used to blow the warmer air at the ceiling back down to make you feel warmer. A fan can be purchased and installed for $100.... more »

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0 votes
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Department of the Treasury

Window Films

We all know that in many instances the costs of heating and cooling a building/home is the biggest component of our utility expenses. (Per the California Energy Commission, 30% of a structure’s cooling requirements are due to solar energy entering through glass) Now consider that many gov't offices are located in buildings/structures that were built years ago under previous building code/standards. When exposed to... more »

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18 votes
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Department of Energy

An Idea to Save Heating and Cooling Costs and Reduce Greenhouse-Gas Emissions

The problem: Many people who work in government operated buildings often feel that the rooms in these buildings are too hot in winter and too cold in summer. The thermostats in many of these buildings either do not work or cannot be adjusted. It is very strange, inconvenient, and wasteful to have to wear short sleeves in the office and then have to bundle up going home or outside during the cold winter, and to have to... more »

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18 votes
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Department of the Interior

Out of the frying pan and into the ice box.

A number of times over this summer, it has been 90 or more degrees outside. The office building I work in would have the air conditioning running such that the interior temperature was enough that I was cold. Rather than cooling buildings to 70 degrees in the summer and heating them to 70 degrees in the winter, air conditioning should be tailored to the current conditions. For example, if outside it is very cold, the... more »

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5 votes
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Department of Health and Human Services

Power down computers when not in use!

Encourage computer users to shut down computers at night if they are not in use. This will not only save the power that the computer uses while sitting idle, but it will cause the computer to generate less heat, meaning cooling systems will also use less power as well. A hidden benefit is that the computers will last longer before component failure, as just being on, whether in use or not, ages the computer faster than... more »

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34 votes
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Department of Commerce

Revolving doors save A/C and heating costs

Revolving doors introduce less outside air into buildings than regular swinging doors. Swinging doors let in more hot air in the summer and cold air in the winter, driving up A/C & heating costs. The exterior handles should be removed from swinging doors, and they should be labeled as "Emergency Exit Only" and be coupled to an alarm. This way, emergency exiting will not be hampered, the revolving doors will be used... more »

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9 votes
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