Social Security Administration

Extend the Thanksgiving Holiday to include the Friday After for ALL Federal Employees: Could save at least $600 million

I suggest you...make the day after Thanksgiving a federal holiday for all federal employees. Including the Friday after Thanksgiving, as part of the Thanksgiving holiday, will reduce the amount of money spent for utilities, guard services, janitorial and other support services. Some federal government entities provide services directly to the public and usually work with a "skeleton crew" the day after Thanksgiving. ...more »

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Department of the Treasury

Require Agency to Implement TeleWork Policy For All Eligible Positions

Increase the number of people working from home by requiring that agencies implement, support, and enforce their policies and allow ALL individuals in positions which have been identified as eligible to work remotely to work from home. Use the pay periods as measures and set up a schedule where half the office works from home on Monday/Wednesday/Friday of the first week and Tuesday and Thursday of the second week and ...more »

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Department of Homeland Security

BALANCING LIFE AND THE MISSION: COMPRESSED SCHEDULING IN LAW ENFORCEMENT

Over the past few decades, many state and municipal law enforcement departments across the country have studied the advantages and disadvantages of implementing a compressed work schedule (CWS) for their uniformed officers and agents. “Lateral thinking,” coined by Edward de Bono (1970) is a set of approaches and techniques designed to find radically new approaches to problems - to come at them from the side rather than ...more »

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Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Too HOT, but way COOL

Many government office buildings are kept too cold in the summer, and too hot in the winter. It is not uncommon to see employees in sweaters in federal offices in the summer. This not only uses excessive energy, but sets a bad example for the general public. All agencies would save significant overhead costs for utilities by adjusting building temperatures a few degrees warmer in the summer (encouraging wearing short ...more »

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General Services Administration

Train Locally – Use Existing FEB Training in 28 Locations Across U.S.

Large cost savings could be gained if federal leaders were encouraged to train their employees in the cities they work. Approximately 88% of the Federal Workforce is located outside of Washington D.C. This is better for the environment and will save the federal government in travel and per diem costs. Federal training already exists in 28 large cities through the Federal Executive Boards (www.Feb.Gov). FEB sponsored ...more »

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Legislative Branch

Turn Federal Building Rooftops into Solar Collectors

My suggestion is for every federal building to allocate 20%-30% of its rooftop space for solar energy. Solar cells would be tied into the grids of DC electric companies. As electricity is generated, meters would automatically move backwards saving the federal government money, enough to offset the cost of this equipment within 5-years or less (especially on weekends, when little or no staff is present).

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Department of Transportation

Solar Street Lights

I think that if every streetlight on federal highways, roads and installations should run primarily on a solar cell that charges by day and can run for 14 hours, per charge. Then, there would be no need to have them on the power grid, which will limit the amount of energy constraints on the system. This will lower the cost of production of energy and help distribute it to other places.

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Department of Homeland Security

Turn off your flat screen monitors!

There are approximately 216,000 people who work for the Department of Homeland Security. If each employee turned off his computer monitor each day the savings would be considerable. The cost to keep a 19" flat screen monitor on for 24 hours a day is $52.00 per year. The cost to keep the same monitor on for 8 hours a day is $17.33, a savings of $34.67 x 216,000, or $7,488,720 annually. Can you imagine the savings if ...more »

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General Services Administration

Business Casual Summer Dress Code + Less A/C

Why are federal employees required to wear suits and ties during the D.C. summer? The summer dress code for all federal workers should be changed to business casual [including golf shirts] and the ambient indoor temperature of office buildings should be increased to 74 degrees. Employees will be more comfortable at work and commuting on mass transit, no more complaints about overly air conditioned offices, and the government ...more »

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Department of Health and Human Services

Power down computers when not in use!

Encourage computer users to shut down computers at night if they are not in use. This will not only save the power that the computer uses while sitting idle, but it will cause the computer to generate less heat, meaning cooling systems will also use less power as well. A hidden benefit is that the computers will last longer before component failure, as just being on, whether in use or not, ages the computer faster than ...more »

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