Campaign: Department of Homeland Security

BALANCING LIFE AND THE MISSION: COMPRESSED SCHEDULING IN LAW ENFORCEMENT

Over the past few decades, many state and municipal law enforcement departments across the country have studied the advantages and disadvantages of implementing a compressed work schedule (CWS) for their uniformed officers and agents. “Lateral thinking,” coined by Edward de Bono (1970) is a set of approaches and techniques designed to find radically new approaches to problems - to come at them from the side rather than ...more »

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Campaign: Department of Homeland Security

BALANCING LIFE AND THE MISSION: COMPRESSED SCHEDULING IN LAW ENFORCEMENT

Over the past few decades, many state and municipal law enforcement departments across the country have studied the advantages and disadvantages of implementing a compressed work schedule (CWS) for their uniformed officers and agents. “Lateral thinking,” coined by Edward de Bono (1970) is a set of approaches and techniques designed to find radically new approaches to problems - to come at them from the side rather than ...more »

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Campaign: Legislative Branch

Turn Federal Building Rooftops into Solar Collectors

My suggestion is for every federal building to allocate 20%-30% of its rooftop space for solar energy. Solar cells would be tied into the grids of DC electric companies. As electricity is generated, meters would automatically move backwards saving the federal government money, enough to offset the cost of this equipment within 5-years or less (especially on weekends, when little or no staff is present).

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Campaign: Department of the Interior

Solar energy

Every flat-top government building receiving sufficient sunlight should have solar panels installed. Solar panels should be installed on risers in large govt parking lots, providing shade for parked cars AND energy. Govt purchase of solar panels will reduce cost of construction (as we did with semiconductors).

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Campaign: Department of Transportation

Solar Street Lights

I think that if every streetlight on federal highways, roads and installations should run primarily on a solar cell that charges by day and can run for 14 hours, per charge. Then, there would be no need to have them on the power grid, which will limit the amount of energy constraints on the system. This will lower the cost of production of energy and help distribute it to other places.

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Campaign: Department of Justice

Solar Panels, are Green, and they Save!

Utlize FDC Honolulu's Roof space to add solar panels. This would Greatly reduce the cost of FDC Honolulu's yearly $1.5 million dollar electric bill. Also adding a covered parking lot with solar panels on the the roof of that, would probably eliminate the electric bill entirely. More importantly it would be great for our environment!

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Campaign: Department of Energy

Solar/Wind energy generators on top of all Fed buildings

Cover all Federal building rooftops with solar panels and small wind turbines. These would largely be out of sight and would help to reduce the huge energy costs for day to day operations in most of these buildings. In addition, it would establish us as a leader in this technology, create much needed jobs, make us a greener entity as a whole, and lessen our dependence on foreign oil. This would be a great step in the ...more »

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Campaign: Environmental Protection Agency

Utilize Solar Panels in arid regions.

In areas where we have plenty of surface area and abundant sunshine we should make the best use of both. Let us the cover the tops of buildings and parking structures with solar panels. Buildings and structures serve a purpose, which is to protect us from the elements; however the tops of these structures just take up space - let us use them to their fullest capability. We should not be so dependent on fossil fuels ...more »

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Campaign: Department of Homeland Security

Greening Energy Costs

Leverage existing government properties to implement green energy technologies to reduce overall energy costs. For example, large vacant property abutting the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, Artesia, NM location could be used to install wind turbines to power the buildings there, reducing overall energy costs of the Center while simultaneously lowering its carbon footprint. The roofs of the building could be ...more »

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Campaign: Department of the Interior

Go solar

The National Park Service should go solar. If we can use all renewable energy in all National Park Service buildings and facilities, it will save lots of money in the long run (though it would be an investment at first). Plus we'd be effecting the environment in a positive way, and leading by example.

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Campaign: Department of Energy

Renewable Energy

How about installing solar panels on government buildings?

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Campaign: Department of Energy

Shining a Light on Energy Production

Turn large numbers of exposed roofs on public buildings, such as schools, libraries, etc... into solar energy farms to generate electricity for use in their missions to educate our children and the community, while providing the national grid with any energy produced beyond their requirements.

 

This concept works in harmony with several national education standards and opportunities for citizen scientist engagement.

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