Showing 16 ideas for tag "water"
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Department of Commerce

Rain Barrels

Install rain barrels on the flat roofs of federal buildings to collect water. This collected water can be used to water the plants or lawns on federal property. The water can also be used for flushing toilets which would save our water resources, the government’s utilities bills and also be good for the environment.

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16 votes
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Department of Justice

Senior Officer John Herb

limit inmate shower usage, showers can be put on a 15 minute block, inmates will turn the showers on and walk away, burning hot water and fuel to heat it, after an inmates showers and turns it off, have it set where it wont work for 2 minutes until the next inmate, we must regulate water usage...

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13 votes
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Department of Health and Human Services

Stop Buying Bottled Water and BYOC Instead!

Tap water is just as healthy as bottled water and, in fact, is more strictly regulated. There is no need to waste money on buying bottled water. San Francisco has banned bottled water and it is estimated that it will save $500,000. Buying bottled water also destroys our environment. 38 billion PET bottles are not recycled annually. If everyone were to bring their own cup (BYOC) to work, government dollars would never... more »

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54 votes
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Department of Justice

Watter Efficiency

I suggest you install water efficient toilets and waterless urinals with chemical odor devices. This would produce an appreciable cost savings in the area of utilities

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3 votes
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Department of Energy

Waterless facilities and mandatory e-mail correspondence

I suggest you begin using waterless urinals to save thousand of gallons of water a year in all government facilities. Falcon, Kohler, and numerous other restroom facility companies manufacture these products that ease cleaning, reduce plumbing costs, and save money. Wired did an entire expose on the issue at http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/06/ff_waterless_urinal/. In addition, mandating the use of e-mail for correspondence... more »

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1 vote
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Legislative Branch

Waterless urinals

We need to install waterless urinals at the highest visited national park sites, and for that matter, at any other federal building with high traffic. Obviously places with low annual rainfall and high bathroom usage should be converted to waterless urinals first (i.e. federal buildings in Phoenix). I've seen these at a few national parks including Chaco Culture NHP in New Mexico and they claim to save tens of thousands... more »

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8 votes
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Department of Commerce

Replace leaking faucets in the HCHB.

In the men's room nearest my office, there are three sinks, and all three of them leak water continuously, 24/7, in streams, not just drips, because the old faucets simply can't be shut off completely. Multiply that by all the restrooms in all eight floors and nine corridors of the HCHB, and you have potentially the worst waste of good potable water I have ever encountered. I like the sense of history I get from walking... more »

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5 votes
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Department of Commerce

Rainwater Collection!

Install rainwater-collection facilities in all Federal buildings, starting with the biggest buildings with the most roof-space, such as the HCHB and the Pentagon. This will both save money for the US Government, and set an example of leadership in resolving water-scarcity issues, which are already getting worse all over the Earth and will surely get still worse before they get better.

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23 votes
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Department of Agriculture

Save water, save money (waterless urinals)

Replace standard urinals with waterless urinals, either as the old ones need replacing, or proactively (if there is an environmentally reasonable way to dispose of existing urinals).

Environmental savings is more important than dollar savings, as water generally is not charged at real value but is artificially low. It is foolish to use drinking-water-grade water in our toilets. Plus, it adds that much more volume into... more »

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-2 votes
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Department of Agriculture

Reduce the sod, go native

Reduce lawn areas in drier regions, replace with native vegetation.

Lawn 2.35 c.f. per square foot
Other Landscaping 1.0 c.f. per square foot

[figures from www.cornerstonesmud.com/id46.htm]

Reduce water use, and lawnmower use, and chemicals (fertilizers, grass feed, broad-leaf herbicides, etc.) that are petroleum-based, and undesirable in groundwater and surface water runoff.

There is a potential big savings in water... more »

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7 votes
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Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency

Improve lawn watering practices

Generally speaking, watering lawns early in the morning is better than during midday. Watering during the day keeps a lot of water from ever making it into the ground, due to evaporation. By watering early in the morning, before it gets warm (especially in the south, like at Johnson Space Center), you end up using far less water for the same effect; this reduces costs and drains on local resources, makes government... more »

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2 votes
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